12 thoughts on “World Holocaust Forum at Yad Vashem: Hijacking the Shoah, Whitewashing Nakba – Tikun Olam תיקון עולם إصلاح العالم
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  1. Hirbat Al Hamama, the land on which Yad Vashem is now located, “…is hardly documented…by either Israeli or Palestinian historians, an oddity considering the number of interested parties invested in producing a detailed description of every single village impacted by the 1948 war. Zochrot, a far-left Israeli organization dedicated to mapping the Nakba, or Catastrophe, the Palestinian name for the war, similarly neglects to mention the village at all, and accounts by Israeli soldiers who fought there in 1948 recall a few empty outposts and one occupied by Jordanian soldiers, not helpless civilians.”

    https://www.tabletmag.com/scroll/255522/israeli-academic-supports-bds-because-yad-vashem-doesnt-commemorate-palestinian-suffering

    I would hardly characterize the historically accurate figure of 120 Deir Yassin villagers as ‘coldblooded’.

    The residents of Deir Yassin had stockpiled weapons and fortified the village. They violently resisted the Zionists, killing four and wounding thirty five.
    https://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/MAGAZINE-testimonies-from-the-censored-massacre-at-deir-yassin-1.5494094

    Most of dead villagers were found in their homes, and many would have died as the the Zionist attackers indiscrimently shot and threw hand grenades into the homes as they fought house to house with the Arab defenders.

    How many villagers died in ‘hot’ combat, and how many were murdered after they surrendered is unknown.

    Rapes? Probably.

    Mutilations? Possibly.
    “It was terrible. I did not see any signs of defilement, mutilation, or rape.” –eyewitness, Dr. Alfred Engel.
    Uri Milstein, The War of Independence: Out of Crisis Came Decision – Volume IV [Hebrew] (Tel Aviv: Zmora-Bitan Publishers, 1991), p. 256., pp.269-270 (interview with Alfred Engel, 7 December 1987).

    1. @ Samantha:

      Hirbat Al Hamama, the land on which Yad Vashem is now located, “…is hardly documented…by either Israeli or Palestinian historians

      Seriously? You’re quoting Liel Leibowitz from Tabloid (aka Tablet) as a Zionist historian? Based on what credentials? This guy has no more knowledge of the history of the period than Alfred E. Newman.

      Zochrot, a far-left Israeli organization dedicated to mapping the Nakba, or Catastrophe, the Palestinian name for the war, similarly neglects to mention the village at all

      More utter crap from Liel. First, I approached Eitan Bronstein, founder of Zochrot and guess what–he offered me historical information about Hirbat al Hamama. It turns out that it probably was not a village. But according the British Mandate map featured here, the small “o” on the map next to the location indicates that it was an orchard within the agricultural lands of Ayn Karem. As I’ve written here to two other Hasbaroids like you–it hardly matters whether there were Palestinians inhabiting houses on the spot. The land belonged the Palestinian villager of Ayn Karem. The Palmach had no more right to steal farm land than they did to expel Palestinians from their lands.

      I would hardly characterize the historically accurate figure of 120 Deir Yassin villagers as ‘coldblooded’. The residents of Deir Yassin had stockpiled weapons and fortified the village. They violently resisted the Zionists, killing four and wounding thirty five.

      When 150 heavily armed Zionist thugs approach your home to destroy you and it, what would you do? Hell yes, I’d resist with whatever means I had, just as Jews have resisted such similar invasions throughout their history. But the question remains does the death of four Lehi thugs warrant the slaughter of 120 Palestinian civilians, 30 times the number of deaths among the Jews? The answer is obviously No.

      As for your disputing the term “coldblooded” in my account of the slaughter there. Let’s see whether even your disgusting cold-bloodedness can be muted by this account from the same source you quoted:

      A young fellow tied to a tree and set on fire. A woman and an old man shot in back. Girls lined up against a wall and shot with a submachine gun….

      “There was a feeling of considerable slaughter and it was hard for me to explain it to myself as having been done in self-defense. My impression was more of a massacre than anything else. If it is a matter of killing innocent civilians, then it can be called a massacre.”

      ““I saw a fair number of corpses,” he added. “I don’t remember encountering the corpse of a fighting man. Not at all. I remember mostly women and old men. An old man and a woman, sitting in the corner of a room with their faces to the wall, and they are shot in the back,” he recalled. “That cannot have been in the heat of battle. No way.”

      “When I got to Deir Yassin, the first thing I saw was a big tree to which a young Arab fellow was tied. And this tree was burnt in a fire. They had tied him to it and burned him. I photographed that”

      Defending slaughter and rape: a disgusting exercise in hasbara. You are revolting.

  2. Having lived through the occupation in 1940-45 in the Netherlands I always feel that what is important today is to tell the truth and you do this time and time again. It is the only way to avoid national socialism, fascism and racism such as antisemitism.

    1. @Dani:

      The circle of dots on the map means it was ruins.

      Prove it. And furthermore, you’re assuming the literal meaning of churva (“ruins”) in Hebrew and the Arabic Hirbat carry the exact same connotation. Not quite true. While they both mean “ruins,” many settled Palestinian villages and towns have Hirbat in their name.

      And even if it was ‘merely’ the fields of Ein Karem, it was still their only means of sustaining themselves. Would it be acceptable for Hungary to exterminate its Jews, then build a national history museum on farm land or factories belonging to the very Jews it murdered? Factories and farm lands which were their sole means of sustenance? No it wouldn’t.

  3. Thank you Richard. Looking at the photos on the BBC news last night while the impeachment hearing was going on, there was something about this that turned me off.. this gathering. They use the Holocaust, these leaders, and the Holocaust, a memory that has become an industry, less a lesson. But if a lesson also, often one that seems “off” morally. Thus the rationales, the looking for enemies elsewhere other than behavior at home. This anniversary (all of them) mines the guilt, the Christian, the European guilt, still dogs that hunt. Israel can get away with anything because of the Holocaust. Israel is a country built upon PTS. And yet there will be those that argue that the Holocaust is not the reason for Israel becoming… the right to be there being from 3000 years ago! The others don’t exist, have no right. Netanyahu did not miss his chance to point outward either, especially at Iran.Those dogs hunt for Arabs and Persians on these occasions. Anti-Semitism is on the rise in the USA since Netanyahu’s pal Trump took office. But it’s been on the rise elsewhere in no small measure because of the Palestinian sore.
    I feel terrible for the people still alive from the Holocaust ( their children who still suffer reverberations, second and third generation) an unimaginable indescribable horror we should never know. They carry memories burned (literally) into them.They must partake and share until their dying days.

  4. You are the one who is making the claim it was a village. Can’t find the legend for the map but I’m not the one who is making the claim.
    Then you make a second claim (which by the way, contradicts your first one), that the place was fields of Ein Karem. Based on what exactly? Your gut feeling?

    You make a claim based on a post on Facebook with a part of a map without a legend that will explain what you are looking at, then you make another story about the place being cultivated by people from Ein Karem.

    Do you call this journalism?

    1. @ Dani:

      Based on what exactly? Your gut feeling?

      I don’t base my reporting on gut feeling. And don’t you dare insult me again in this fashion.

      Read the post again carefully. It wasn’t me making the claim it was a village. I relied on the founder of Zochrot, Israel’s leading expert on Nakba and destroyed Palestinian communities. He called it a “little locality.” Nadav Frankovich says that it consisted of the agricultural fields belonging to Ayn Karem. After I queried Eitan Bronstein a 2nd time, I decided Frankovich might be correct and I have edited the post to reflect his view. That is called journalism, contrary to what you believe.

      Nor did you bother to note that I edited the post because you were too busy making your own unsupported claims based on a faulty knowledge of Arabic, that Hirbat al Hamama was a “ruins.” I’ve got news for you–farmers do not consider their lands to be empty of value or “ruins.” They are in fact not only quite valuable, they are their sole means of sustenance. And both Ayn Karem and its lands were destroyed by the Palmach in July 1948. That’s historical fact.

      You make a claim based on a post on Facebook with a part of a map without a legend

      It would be quite easy for you to find the map in a historical archive in Israel. So prove your claim is correct. Find the map and the legend and then your claim might be considered credible. Till then, not a chance. And btw, I’ll put Eitan Bronstein and Nadav Frankovich’s knowledge on Hirbat al Hamama, Nakba in general, and maps of destroyed Palestinian villages above yours any day of the week.

      Do you call this journalism?

      I don’t give a shit what you think or what you call what I do.

      This was your last comment in this thread. Do not publish again in it.

  5. So true, the dehumanization of the Palestinians continue, they are not only brutalized but they are denied the basic human and rights bestowed upon them by their creator God almighty including their natural rights for self defense.

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