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Cartoon Satire Skewers Stephen Hawking’s Attackers

Eli valley cartoon on stephen hawkingThe Forward’s Eli Valley has penned a deliciously sly, knowing send-up of the hasbara bonanza that followed on Stephen Hawking’s cancellation of his talk at the Shimon Peres conference.  Those of you who followed it could read any number of the hasbarafia who noted that Hawking’s speech processor contained an Intel chip developed in Israel.  Haaretz’s Chemi Shalev even used the disgusting, condescending term “poster boy” to describe Hawking’s supposed relation to the BDS movement.

Valley titles his cartoon, The Hypocrisy of Stephen Hawking. But don’t be fooled because he’s speaking in the voice of the pro-Israel crowd who were in high dudgeon over the affair.  He begins his list of Israel’s achievements with the Intel processor, but by the end he’s claiming Hawking’s teeth contain phosphorus:

Teeth: Teeth contain phosphorus.  Israel is a global leader in white phosphorus technology.

By then, the joke’s on the hasbara crowd, who began thinking Valley would ratify their prejudices, and ended feeling confused and even betrayed.  That’s the hidden power of the best satire.  The target may read it believing it reinforces his worst prejudices.  But by the end, he develops a sinking, queasy feeling in his stomach that something’s not quite right.  As Dylan once sang:

Something’s happenin’ here but you don’t know what it is,
Do you, Mr. Jones?

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{ 14 comments… add one }

  • dickerson3870 May 14, 2013, 11:28 PM

    RE: “Those of you who followed it could read any number of the hasbarafia who noted that Hawking’s speech processor contained an Intel chip developed in Israel.” ~ R.S.

    WHY I NO LONGER BY COMPUTERS WITH INTEL PROCESSORS OR OTHER COMPONENTS:
    “Intel chip plant located on disputed Israeli land”, by Henry Norr, San Francisco Chronicle, 7/08/02

    [EXCERPTS] Just how diligent was Intel’s due diligence when it chose to build a multibillion-dollar chip plant in Qiryat Gat, Israel? . . .
    . . . Intel calls the plant Fab 18 (“fab” being chip-industry jargon for a facility where the silicon wafers that are eventually turned into working chips are fabricated). The fab, which went into production in 1999, was the fruit of a $1 billion investment by the Santa Clara company, supplemented by a $600 million grant from the Israeli government. . .
    . . . But from a legal and historical point of view,
    Qiryat Gat happens to be an unusual location: It was not taken over by the Israeli military in 1948. Instead, it was part of a small enclave, known as the Faluja pocket, that the Egyptian army and local Palestinian forces had managed to hold through the end of the war.
    The area was surrounded by Israeli forces, however.
    When Israel and Egypt signed an armistice agreement in February 1949, the latter agreed to withdraw its soldiers, but it insisted that the agreement explicitly guarantee the safety and property of the 3,100 or so Arab civilians in the area.
    Israel accepted that demand.
    In an exchange of letters that were filed with the United Nations and became an annex to the main armistice agreement, the two countries agreed that “those of the civilian population who may wish to remain in Al-Faluja and Iraq al Manshiya (the two villages within the enclave covered by the letters) are to be permitted to do so. . . . All of these civilians shall be fully secure in their persons, abodes, property and personal effects.” . . .
    . . . Within days, the security the agreement had promised residents of the Al- Faluja pocket proved an illusion. Within weeks, the entire local population had fled to refugee camps outside of Israel.
    Morris presents ample evidence that the people of the Al-Faluja area left in response to a campaign of intimidation conducted by the Israeli military. He quotes, among other sources, reports filed by Ralph Bunche, the distinguished black American educator and diplomat who was serving as chief U. N. mediator in the region.
    Bunche’s reports include complaints from U.N. observers on the scene that “Arab civilians . . . at Al-Faluja have been beaten and robbed by Israeli soldiers,” that there were attempted rapes and that the Israelis were “firing promiscuously” on the Arab population. . .

    ENTIRE ARTICLE – http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2002/07/08/BU162036.DTL

  • Rehmat May 15, 2013, 6:00 AM

    [comment deleted for comment rule violation--stop spamming my blog with links to your own. I asked you politely yesterday to stop doing this.]

  • Andrej Szceczinsky May 16, 2013, 12:36 AM

    ” Israel is a global leader in white phosphorus technology.” No kidding, they bombard Palestinian civilians with it.
    “Hair would not exist without Samson” Really?! Clearly the writer believes the earth is flat, or only a few thousand years old.
    “Jews invented the wheel” O please. Tell that to the Sumerians, or the Moenjodarans or even the Poles for that matter.
    As for Einstein discovering the atom….words fail me.
    Proof, if any were needed, Zionists lie.

    • Richard Silverstein May 16, 2013, 2:06 AM

      The cartoon is meant as satire. Did you not read my post??

      • Matan May 16, 2013, 4:51 AM

        Poe’s Law strikes again…
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poe%27s_Law

      • Deïr Yassin May 16, 2013, 6:57 AM

        I think Andrej has no idea about how the hasbara works. Even before coming to the white phosperous, the talking point about King Solomon should ring some bells, but how could he miss the ‘Tel Aviv Gay Mecca’ and ‘Israel invented the hummus’ ? Or Einstein teaching at Ariel ? Maybe he has no humor at all.
        This is one of the best hasbara debunkers I’ve ever read, and I going to use it often.

      • Andrej Szceczinsky May 17, 2013, 4:18 AM

        Oops….! :-D

  • Fred Plester May 16, 2013, 11:46 AM

    I’m amazed to find that there’s a mobile computing device that does not use an ARM chip in this day and age.

  • Andrej Szceczinsky May 17, 2013, 4:21 AM

    Everyone has a right to make a fool of themselves from time to time, this was my turn.

  • gloopygal May 18, 2013, 7:56 AM
    • DavidL May 20, 2013, 10:23 AM

      The only sad thing here is your slur.

      The article claims nothing about inventing Jazz, but of the Jazz music coming out of Israel. Nobody in the article claims any proprietary hold on Jazz. Jazz can come from any country and be played by a variety of people. In this case there seems to be some very talented Jazz musicians coming from Israel…. too tough for you to handle??

      It seems more like you, sadly, just want to try and make a stupid comment and perpetuate nonsense.

      • gloopygal May 21, 2013, 12:40 PM

        My friend did the work here so I can’t take credit, but here’s an excerpt from the article and her response:

        CT: “Jazz has deep roots in the Jewish culture,” says Higgins, and that’s true enough. Benny Goodman and Artie Shaw emerged as major jazz stars in the 1930s and ’40s, each weaving elements of Jewish music into their work. That both of these artists attained global fame thanks, in part, to their virtuosity on clarinet seems telling, the instrument integral to klezmer music and other Jewish folkloric music.

        F: What a load of unmusical waffle. Jazz has deep roots in African-American and European culture and Benny Goodman and Artie Shaw used an instrument associated with klezmer to play it on, that’s all. The violin’s also associated with klezmer. That doesn’t mean that music played on it has Jewish roots.

        • Richard Silverstein May 21, 2013, 2:03 PM

          @gloopygal: It is much more apt to speak of the influence that klezmer and Jewish music had on American popular music (Tin Pan Alley, musicals, etc.) of the era than to argue that Jewish music had a deep impact on jazz. Of course, African-American blues had a much deeper impact.

          • gloopygal May 21, 2013, 3:40 PM

            Tell that to Michelle Higgens. I hope no one shows up to this event. Especially after they cancelled the Arabesque Festival in the Daley Plaza that was so successful for the past few years. I never thought I’d miss Richard Daley, before Mayor Rahm-bo came into town.

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